Capturing the expressive movement of a dancer

Since humans first put charcoal to rock, we’ve been fascinated by portraying the human form.

(Did you know Leonardo da Vinci’s artist studies of the human body were more accurate than the current knowledge of anatomy?)

And I can understand the fascination. Sitting in life drawing sessions, watching how a real human body effortlessly and naturally curves and moves in front of me – it’s beautiful to watch. I love the expressiveness that occurs, even in stillness or relaxation.

10-minute charcoal sketch of woman in repose.
10-minute charcoal sketch of woman in repose.

I love the strength, and the potential of movement.

2-minute charcoal sketch.
2-minute charcoal sketch.

For the Raglan Arts Weekend, every artist donates a 300 x 300mm piece to help with fundraising. This year, I went to one of my favourite inspirations – the movement of a dancer – and used what I’ve learned sketching figures. Here she is – a bright, expressive, vivid dancer in red.

©2017, Ailene Cuthbertson, Dancer in red. Acrylic on canvas, 30 cm x 30 cm
©2017, Ailene Cuthbertson, Dancer in red. Acrylic on canvas, 30 cm x 30 cm

You can see her now at the Raglan Old School Arts Centre (5 Stewart Street) where the Raglan Arts Weekend exhibition is now on.

Me and my "Dancer in red" at the Raglan Arts Weekend exhibition. On now at the Raglan Old School Arts Centre.
Me and my “Dancer in red” at the Raglan Arts Weekend exhibition. On now at the Raglan Old School Arts Centre.

She’s a bit different but I rather like where this experiment is going. What do you think? I’d love to hear.

I wish you a sunny Merry Christmas, and see you for more adventures in the New Year!

Keep on shining bright,

Ailene